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Dinosaur-murdering asteroid formed a huge chamber of magma that lasted millions of years, study reveals

Recent analysis shows that the meteor that crashed into Earth about 66 million years ago and wiped out the dinosaurs has created a giant lake of magma that is several times bigger than the crater at the heart of Yellowstone National Park.

According to reports published today in Science Advances, the accident, identified as the Chicxulub impact disaster, destroyed 75 per cent of all life on Earth and also created a large hydrothermal field loaded with magma.

Dinosaur-murdering asteroid formed a huge chamber of magma that lasted millions of years, study reveals
Recent analysis shows that the meteor that crashed into Earth about 66 million years ago and wiped out the dinosaurs has created a giant lake of magma that is several times bigger than the crater at the heart of Yellowstone National Park.
According to reports published today in Science Advances, the accident, identified as the Chicxulub impact disaster, destroyed 75 per cent of all life on Earth and also created a large hydrothermal field loaded with magma.

“Chicxulub is the largest, best-preserved crater on Earth and is thus our best example of the craters that were produced early in Earth history,” David Kring, the first author of the study and a researcher from the Lunar and Planetary Institute in Texas, explained to Gizmodo.

“There were thousands of craters its size and larger when life emerged on Earth. There is evidence that suggests that life emerged from hydrothermal systems, potentially produced by impacting asteroids and comets,” he added.

For the study, Kring and his colleagues examined chemically altered rocks pulled from the Chicxulub crater. A drilling expedition led by two groups of international scientists provided the samples, after having acquired them from deep below the seafloor.

A different study released earlier this week found that the asteroid slammed into Earth at the “deadliest possible angle” of about 60 degrees, which maximized the amount of climate-changing gases that were thrust into the upper atmosphere.

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